Category Archives: Our research

We present our research

On being authentic

By Natalie Woods

When I recorded this video I didn’t have the philosophy of education in mind. However, I think some of the themes discussed will be relevant to anyone interested in education.

On being authentic

Continue reading

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Criticism of theories, General, History of education, Our research

Chapter One: Art and Education

By Natalie Woods

By 2016, in many of the world’s most affluent societies, the utopian impulse had been extinguished. Utopianism was viewed as naïve, a relic of the past, affiliated with brutal, post war regimes. Cynicism was embedded deeply in education, where there had been a move away from idealistic visions of what it meant to be educated, or what it meant to pursue ‘the good life’, towards policies and practices that were grounded in a language of scientific certainty, and economic efficiency.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Criticism of theories, Dispelling myths, General, History of education, Our research

John Dewey: Experience and education

By Richard McCance

For the educationalists out there, this may be a simple refresher but for those not familiar with this important educational philosopher I hope this is a helpful introduction to some very relevant ideas.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under General, History of education, Our research

What does it mean to be an educated person? An historical overview.

By Natalie Woods

Introduction

Plato, Aristotle, and Rousseau associated the aims of education with beliefs about society, reason and emotion, and knowledge and freedom. Their treatment of these themes profoundly influenced ideals of the ‘educated person’ that emerged in the West during the 19th century. A review of literature published since the late 19th century revealed that these ideals generally fell into one of four broad categories: the rational individual; the worker; the explorer; and, the critical intellectual. Each vision made assumptions about society, human nature, knowledge, and freedom. This review outlines those visions, discusses the tensions between them, and analyses the influence they have had on contemporary educational thought and policy in New Zealand.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Criticism of theories, Dispelling myths, General, History of education, Our research

Team Teaching

By Nathan Woods

Team-teaching can motivate students and teachers, and help to create an open, democratic learning environment. When working in teams, teachers can take advantage of their differences in knowledge, opinions, ideas, and personality to model collaborative dialogue and behaviour, which can improve learning outcomes for students (Cotton, 1982; Murata, 2002; Slater, 1993; Walker, 2008). So why is teaming so difficult to implement, and what can go wrong? Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under General, Our research

Education for Democracy

By Nathan Woods

Democracy is a political and moral system that values freedom, equality, and individual human rights. In this article, I will consider what knowledge should be included in a curriculum for democracy.

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under General, Our research